Why Hypnosis Is Better For Stress Than Meditating

Stress Is The Life Killer

Stress is the greatest problem for people in the modern world, and it’s much worse than just health problems such as Strokes, heart attacks and hypertension that are brought on by too much stress for way too long. Stress impacts EVERYTHING. 90% of all illness has its roots in stress.

Stress kills our libido, impacts on fertility, our enjoyment of life; stress causes disturbed emotions of anger, rage, sadness and depression; stress makes us clumsy; stress causes us to make mistakes and worst of all, stress makes us think stupid thoughts (we become “stress stupid”) and it cuts off the internal flow to our creative and innate talents and abilities.

It is clear that we ALL need to de-stress, whether we are teenagers who suffer from acne and migraines as a result of stress, men and women in “anger management”, authors who suffer from writer’s block even, business people who burst a blood vessel, or parents at home who aren’t enjoying their kids but end up screaming at them all the time instead.

So how do we de-stress, and urgently, and FAST?

Why Stress & Meditation Are At Odds

Many hold that meditating and meditation alone is the answer to stress.
Meditating and meditation is the act of entering into altered states of consciousness, to widen our conscious awareness and to re-connect with the super subconsciousness of our energy mind, our subconscious mind, subconsciousness if you like.

This does not happen when we are stressed – a person under stress is like a TV that isn’t tuning properly. Everything is disturbed, mad, doesn’t fit together, there is no clarity, life is full of static.

Trying to meditate when you are stressed is like trying to be romantic with […]

By |April 8th, 2014|Anxiety, CBT - Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, Depression, Self Hypnosis, Stress, Talking Therapy, The Mind|Comments Off on Why Hypnosis Is Better For Stress Than Meditating

Your Guide To Hypnosis

Your Guide To Hypnosis

There are many stories about hypnosis and hypnotherapy being dangerous, turning people into chickens, people not being able to wake up, and unscrupulous hypnotists exploiting their ‘vulnerable’ patients. However there are many people who are adamant that it has helped change their lives, some from Dudley, Tipton, Wolverhampton and much further afield – I know of for sure. I have helped them succeed in their goals. Millions of people swear that it has helped them with many issues such as weight loss, quitting smoking, other addictions, confidence, phobias, stress, success, IBS, and many more issues.

Many people are missing out on this powerful, yet very safe therapeutic tool because they are too afraid to use it. I hope to dispel these fears by answering these common questions about hypnotherapy right here and now!.

Can I be hypnotised? Most people can go into a hypnotic trance. The only types of people that cannot be hypnotised are … 1. Those suffering from psychosis or a thought disorder 2. A person with a low IQ 3. A person who does not want to be hypnotised. It is very easy to resist hypnosis if you want to.
What is a hypnotic trance? It is a normal and natural state that most of us experience several times a day without even knowing it. It commonly happens when people are driving. Have you ever driven somewhere and not really remembered the journey?, I have just missed my junction. It also often occurs when reading a book or watching TV. Sometimes you can be so absorbed in the book or TV programme that you are not consciously aware that someone is talking to you, or even where you are sat. Hypnosis […]

CBT on prescription, pick it up at the library?

CBT on prescription, pick it up at the library? Wiltshire embraces new scheme to help depression through reading

The library facility at County Hall, Trowbridge The library facility at County Hall, Trowbridge

A new scheme which uses reading to help the six million people in England who suffer from conditions such as depression and anxiety, is now available to access in libraries across Wiltshire.

Reading Well Books on Prescription will enable GPs and other health professionals to recommend 30 self-help titles for people to borrow from the local library. The service, which launched nationally last Tuesday, is now being put into place in public libraries across England.

It is a joint initiative from independent charity The Reading Agency and the Society of Chief Librarians, working with local library services and LIFT Psychology Teams, and offers people self-help books from the library as part of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) prescribed by a health professional.

Wiltshire Council, in partnership with Swindon Borough Council, will both have multiple copies of the core list of 30 titles covering issues such as anxiety, depression, phobias, panic attacks, bulimia and sleep problems. The titles will be available to borrow free of charge from local library branches or online through the request service.

Jonathon Seed, cabinet member for libraries, said: “This scheme will allow anyone in Wiltshire, in need of such support, to access self-help books locally and for free. Our libraries are friendly, community focused places, so I am delighted we are able to participate and help support the health and well-being of many local people.”

4:59pm Tuesday 11th June 2013 in News

Source: http://www.gazetteandherald.co.uk/news/10477297.Wiltshire_embraces_new_scheme_to_help_depression_through_reading/

Comment: A brilliant idea! More CCG’s should follow this example. The more a patient […]

Panic Attacks and Anxiety

Panic Attacks and Anxiety

Panic Attacks and Anxiety and hypnosis papers

Hypnosis and CBT with depression and anxiety’. Ester German.  Australian Journal of Clinical & Experimental Hypnosis (May 2004) Vol. 32(1), p.p. 71-85. ‘Cognitive-behavioural hypnotic treatment for managing examination anxiety and facilitating performance’. Calvin Kai-Ching Yu.  Contemporary Hypnosis (2006), Vol. 2(23), p.p. 72-82.  www.interscience.wiley.com/journal/ch‘The casual role of negative imagery in social anxiety: a test in confident public speaking’. Hirsch C. et al.  Journal of Behaviour Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry (2006), Vol.37(2). ‘The role of imagery in the maintenance and treatment of snake fear’. Hunt M. et al.  Journal of Behaviour Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry (2006), Vol. 37(4).

By |December 16th, 2011|Anxiety, CBT - Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, Depression, Fears, Panic Attacks, Stress|Comments Off on Panic Attacks and Anxiety

Gut-directed hypnosis helps IBS patients

Gut-directed hypnosis helps IBS patients – A Swedish study says regular hypnotherapy treatments can help patients who suffer from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and whose symptoms are not improving.

IBS is a functional bowel disorder characterized by chronic abdominal pain, discomfort, bloating, diarrhea and constipation in the absence of any detectable organic cause.

Although the main cause of the disease remains unclear a number of treatments have found to be effective such as following special dietary guidelines, medications, and psychological treatments such as cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT), hypnosis and relaxation.

new study by University of Gothenburg found that gut-directed hypnosis by local therapists can also help some people with IBS.

Two separate studies were conducted on 138 patients with IBS that had resisted standard therapy. Participants were randomly divided to two groups either undergoing a dozen hypnotherapy sessions or receiving only advice on diet and relaxation techniques.

During the first study which involved 90 patients, after 3 months 38 percent of the hypnotherapy group showed at least 25 percent reduction in their symptoms especially pain and bloating compared with 11 percent of the other group.

In the second study, of 48 patients, one-quarter of the hypnosis group experienced fewer symptoms compared with 13 percent of those who were on a wait-list for receiving hypnosis therapy. The difference, however, was not statistically significant, which means it could have been affected by chance.

Although the success rate of hypnotherapy was lower in these studies compared with previous investigations, the new findings showed that hypnosis could help IBS patients in real life and not just in sophisticated medical centers which are not available for many.

The other positive aspect of using hypnotherapy for IBS patients […]

Hypnosis may help irritable bowel syndrome

Hypnosis may help irritable bowel syndrome

Hypnosis may help some people with stubborn cases of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) find some relief from their symptoms, a new study suggests.

A number of studies since the 1980s have found that “gut-directed” hypnosis can help some people with IBS when standard treatment fails. The new study is different in that patients were treated by therapists in their communities rather than at highly specialized medical centers.

So, the researchers say, the findings give a better idea of how hypnosis might work for IBS in the “real world.”

In two separate studies, they randomly assigned 138 patients with IBS that had resisted standard therapy to either a dozen sessions of hypnosis or to a “control” group.

In one study, which included 90 patients, 38 percent of hypnosis patients were treatment “responders” after 3 months — meaning their symptom scores had dropped by at least 25 percent. That compared with 11 percent of patients in the control group, who only received advice on diet and relaxation techniques.

In the second study, of 48 patients, one-quarter of the hypnosis group were responders, compared with 13 percent of the control group (where patients were put on a wait-list for hypnosis therapy). That difference was not statistically significant, which means it could have been due to chance.

The hypnosis patients did, though, have a bigger average drop in symptoms of pain and bloating.

People with IBS have repeated bouts of abdominal cramps, bloating, constipation and diarrhea. Standard treatment includes diet changes, as well as anti-diarrheal medication and, for constipation, laxatives or fiber supplements.

For many people, that`s enough to bring symptom relief, said Olafur S. Palsson, an associate professor of medicine at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

But for people […]

By |November 18th, 2011|CBT - Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, Hypnotherapy, IBS - Irritable bowel Syndrome, The Body, The Mind|Comments Off on Hypnosis may help irritable bowel syndrome

A digested guide to perfect digestion

A digested guide to perfect digestion: Experts reveal how to relieve common symptoms – with some very surprising advice

We are a nation obsessed with our guts. From bloating to bowel issues, an estimated nine million of us have problems with our digestive systems. ‘The number of people being diagnosed with digestive disorders is on the rise, as people are taking their symptoms more seriously and are getting diagnosed earlier,’ says Dr Anton Emmanuel of the gut health charity CORE. One in five of us suffers with Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), a disorder of the gastrointestinal tract characterised by diarrhoea, stomach cramps and bloating.

Nine million sufferers: One in five of us suffers from Irritable Bowel SyndromeNine million sufferers: One in five of us suffers from Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Many of us resort to all kinds of measures for a healthy gut, chomping through bowls of high-fibre cereals and guzzling water. But could we be unwittingly making our symptoms worse?

Here, some of the country’s leading digestive experts dispel the most common myths and advise how to have a happy gut.

DITCH THE FIBRE

IBS patients are often told to eat more fibre. ‘But this is the worst thing for a significant number of patients, particularly when it comes to bran,’ says Peter Whorwell, professor of medicine at Wythenshawe Hospital in Manchester and a leading authority on IBS.

‘While eating more fibre undoubtedly helps to sort out mild constipation, it’s rarely helpful for severe IBS symptoms and it won’t help diarrhoea. Fibre is a bulking agent which gives the bowel even more work to do, so it’s likely to worsen symptoms in people with severe constipation.’

Instead, he advises white bread, white pasta, […]

Evidence Based Hypnotherapy

Evidence Based Hypnotherapy

Review of Evidence-Based Hypnotherapy: by Donald Robertson.
Which Forms of Hypnotherapy are Evidence-Based?
Hypnotherapy as Empirically-Supported Treatment (EST)

Ratings using Chambless & Hollon (1998) criteria reviewed by David M. Wark (2008)
Copyright © Donald Robertson, 2009  Reprinted from The Hypnotherapy Journal Spring 2009

I beg farther to remark, if my theory and pretensions, as to the nature, cause, and extent of the phenomena of have none of the fascinations of the transcendental to captivate the lovers of the marvellous, the credulous and enthusiastic, which the pretensions and alleged occult agency of the mesmerists have, still I hope my views will not be the less acceptable to honest and sober-minded men, because they are all level to our comprehension, and reconcilable with well-known physiological and psychological principles.  – James Braid, Hypnotic Therapeutics, 1853

One of the most useful articles to be published recently was arguably Wark’s review of those studies on hypnotherapy that were rated as meeting the Chambless & Hollon (1998) criteria for “empirically-supported treatments” in the field of psychology, known as ESTs for short.  It may not surprise many NCH members to know that when the research literature on psychotherapy was previously reviewed by a task force of nineteen psychologists led by Prof. Dianne Chambless most of the psychological therapies identified as “empirically-supported” (formerly termed “empirically-validated”) tended to be specific forms of cognitive and/or behaviour therapy (CBT).  Most forms of psychotherapy, ranging from the more controversial and pseudoscientific ones to some of the more “respectable” and mainstream approaches, do not meet these strict criteria for empirical support.  However, one study was identified which demonstrated that cognitive-behavioural hypnotherapy (CBH) was “probably efficacious” for weight loss in obese clients.  In this respect, hypnotherapy might (tentatively) be said to […]

Phobias: How I Beat My Fear Of Butterflies

Phobias: How I Beat My Fear Of Butterflies

Story Image CBT sessions helped Tina overcome her phobia

MORE than two million Britons suffer from phobias. Although they can seem insignificant to others, the condition can dominate lives. Adrian Lee talks to one woman about how she overcame her anxiety.

WHEN Tina Crawford was making plans for her wedding, there was one overriding fear. She was terrified that her big day would be ruined by a butterfly or moth fluttering into  the church as she walked down  the aisle. If that happened she  knew that within a few seconds she’d be frozen to the spot, begin hyperventilating and could faint.

More than two million Britons suffer from phobias and although often trivialised or ridiculed, they can dominate lives.

Celebrities suffer from them too. Earlier this month Kylie Minogue revealed her own bizarre phobia. The singer is terrified of coat hangers, she hates the sight and sound of them and has even designed a special wardrobe to display her outfits.

In Tina’s case, the 38-year-old was compelled to arrange her wedding in the depths of winter when she knew the chances of an encounter with a moth or butterfly were negligible.

“People don’t appreciate how a phobia can disable you in so many ways,” says Tina, a former television researcher from Croydon, south London, who is now a full-time mum to Toby, two. “I kept the windows shut in summer and was frightened to go out of the house.

“Even the thought of a butterfly or a picture of one in a book could be enough to make me sick. We even arranged holidays to cold places where there was less chance of coming across them.”

Her phobia began […]

By |June 1st, 2010|Anxiety, CBT - Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, Celebrity & Hypnotherapy, Hypnotherapy, Phobias|Comments Off on Phobias: How I Beat My Fear Of Butterflies

Telephone Hypnosis

Telephone Hypnosis

No matter where you live, no matter if its in a remote community or in a big city in the UK or overseas you can always reach therapists who is skilled in working with your type of problem. Technology has certainly brought the world to your doorstep. At one time it could have been be costly and very difficult to get the right help you need. You may of had to travel far to locate and visit a therapist who specialises in what condition or issue that needed a resolution. That’s until now. That is why we offer you the opportunity to have hypnosis over the phone and via Skype.

Simply log on to Skype and search for HypnoFix

Remote telephone  hypnosis offers my clients a session of hypnosis whilst they are in the privacy and comfort of their own home, giving them an enhanced sense of control over the process. People sometimes feel more relaxed in their own environment instead of a therapy room. This can be especially helpful for those who lack self confidence to leave the house or home and need help but may not have the ability to go to a therapist directly, such as agoraphobics and those with eating disorders, chronic IBS patients who cant be away from the bathroom or problematic compulsive habits who need support.

Sessions can be arranged to suit. Like all the therapy conducted by HypnoFix, it is tailored to the client’s needs and we treat people according to their specific needs.

An article in New Scientist Magazine from 29 January 2002 claims that a small UK study suggests tele-hypnosis can be even more effective than […]