Your Guide To Hypnosis

Your Guide To Hypnosis

There are many stories about hypnosis and hypnotherapy being dangerous, turning people into chickens, people not being able to wake up, and unscrupulous hypnotists exploiting their ‘vulnerable’ patients. However there are many people who are adamant that it has helped change their lives, some from Dudley, Tipton, Wolverhampton and much further afield – I know of for sure. I have helped them succeed in their goals. Millions of people swear that it has helped them with many issues such as weight loss, quitting smoking, other addictions, confidence, phobias, stress, success, IBS, and many more issues.

Many people are missing out on this powerful, yet very safe therapeutic tool because they are too afraid to use it. I hope to dispel these fears by answering these common questions about hypnotherapy right here and now!.

Can I be hypnotised? Most people can go into a hypnotic trance. The only types of people that cannot be hypnotised are … 1. Those suffering from psychosis or a thought disorder 2. A person with a low IQ 3. A person who does not want to be hypnotised. It is very easy to resist hypnosis if you want to.
What is a hypnotic trance? It is a normal and natural state that most of us experience several times a day without even knowing it. It commonly happens when people are driving. Have you ever driven somewhere and not really remembered the journey?, I have just missed my junction. It also often occurs when reading a book or watching TV. Sometimes you can be so absorbed in the book or TV programme that you are not consciously aware that someone is talking to you, or even where you are sat. Hypnosis […]

IBS – Are you Suffering?

IBS – Are you Suffering?

OK What is irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)?

Irritable bowel syndrome is a “syndrome,” meaning a group of symptoms put together to form one identifiable ‘Illness’ – IBS. The most common symptoms of IBS are abdominal pain or discomfort often reported as cramping, bloating, wind, gas, diarrhea, and/or constipation or alternating symptoms of constipation and diarrhoea.

IBS affects 20% of the UK population from time to time whilst others a Hardcore of about 15% have it more regularly or Constantly. IBS affects the colon, or large bowel or intestine, which is the part of the digestive tract that stores stool or Poo.

IBS is not a ‘disease’. It’s a functional disorder, meaning that the bowel doesn’t work as well as it should, or function, correctly too fast or too slow.

Does stress cause IBS?

Emotional stress does not cause IBS it contributes to it!. But people with IBS may have their bowels react more to stress. So, if you already have IBS, stress can make your symptoms worse.

Stress Relief

Learning to reduce stress can help with IBS. With less stress, you may find you have less cramping and pain. You may also find it easier to manage your symptoms. I Can help you with this with my IBS programme and relaxation Sessions and teaching you self Hypnosis Call 01384621857 for the start to the way out of IBS. Meditation, exercise,and counseling may also help.
You may need to try different activities or a combination to see what works best for you.

Points to Remember

  • IBS means your bowel doesn’t work the right way.
  • IBS can cause cramping, bloating, gas, diarrhea , and constipation.
  • IBS doesn’t damage the bowel or lead to other […]

Gluten and you

Gluten and you

IBS Gluten and you – New regulation affecting food manufacture. If you have IBS and suspect gluten may be part of the problem, or suffer from Celiac disease This information is important to you. The levels of gluten from foods claiming to be either ‘gluten-free‘ or ‘very low gluten‘ have been introduced by EC Regulation 41/2009 respectively as 20 parts per million of gluten or less and 100 parts per million or less – although only foods with cereal content that has been specially processed to remove the gluten may make the very low gluten claim.IBSSlogoThe EC Regulation allows the two terms to be used as appropriate on labellings, while only allowing the phrase ‘suitable for coeliacs‘ to be used alongside them and not on its own. The term ‘No gluten-containing ingredients‘ may be used on food where no gluten containing ingredients have been added, but a small amount may be present from contact with other foods. This phrase has no legal force so it cannot guarantee that food bearing it is free. The gluten levels labeling regime introduced in the EC regulation have been implemented in England by The Foodstuffs Suitable for People intolerant to gluten (England) regulation.

This regulation has been adopted also in Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. Source: www.tinyurl.com/bizinf-613z9 & www.tinyurl.com/bizinf-613z9e

 

Treat Dyspepsia & IBS

Treat Dyspepsia & IBS

Hypnosis to Treat Dyspepsia & IBS

Dyspepsia is a very common gastrointestinal disorder. Researchers and doctors are not sure what the underlying causes are of the disorder, which makes treating dyspepsia somewhat challenging. However, researchers have found that hypnotherapy has helped treat the symptoms of the disorder.

IBSSlogoThe major symptom of dyspepsia is upper abdominal pain which is not caused by a type of disease. The symptoms often overlap with irritable bowel syndrome and researchers believe that both could be a result of the same disorder. Some theories as to what causes dyspepsia include acid secretion, stiff stomach, delayed stomach emptying, and stomach hypersensitivity.

When diagnosing dyspepsia, other disorders must be ruled out including diabetes, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and peptic ulcers. Treatment of dyspepsia often depends on the patients symptoms. The Mayo Clinic suggests lifestyle changes and behavioral therapy to treat the disorder.

Hypnosis has already been shown to be a highly effective treatment for irritable bowel syndrome. One study aimed at researching the effect of hypnosis on dyspepsia. The study consisted of 126 participants diagnosed with functional dyspepsia. They received hypnotherapy, supportive therapy and placebo, or medical treatment. Dyspepsia symptoms were analyzed before treatment began, after the 16-week treatment, and during a 56-week follow-up.

Results of the study showed that the hypnotherapy group saw more improvement in the short-term (16 weeks) compared to the therapy and medication groups. Looking at the long-term results, the hypnotherapy group showed significantly improved symptoms. Of the participants in the study, 73% of those in the hypnosis group reported improvement, compared to 34% of the therapy group and 43% of the medicine group.

Hypnosis is often overlooked for use in medical […]

Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Irritable Bowel Syndrome & Hypnotherapy the research

IBSSlogoThe following studies have taken place and are listed here for an on behalf of an evidenced based treatment of IBS.

‘Hypnotherapy and refractory irritable bowel syndrome: a single case study’. Tara E. Galovski, Edward B. Blanchard.  American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis (July 2002), Vol.45, No.1, p.p.31-38.

‘Treatment with hypnotherapy reduces the sensory and motor component of the gastro colonic response in irritable bowel syndrome’. Magnus Simrén.  Psychosomatic Medicine (Mar-Apr 2004), Vol. 66(2), p.p.233-238.

‘The nature of IBS and the need for a psychological approach’. Olafur S. Palsson.  Editor’s Preamble, The International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis (January 2006), Vol.54(1), p.p.1-6.

‘Hypnosis for Irritable Bowel Syndrome:  the empirical evidence of therapeutic effects’. William E. Whitehead.  The International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis (January 2006), Vol.54(1), p.p.7-20.

‘Effective management of Irritable Bowel Syndrome – the Manchester Model’. Peter J. Whorwell. The International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis (January 2006), Vol.54(1), p.p.21-26.

‘Gut-directed hypnotherapy:  the Manchester approach for treatment of Irritable Bowel Syndrome’. Wendy M. Gonsalkorale.  The International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis (January 2006), Vol.54(1), p.p.27-50.

‘Standardized hypnosis treatment for Irritable Bowel Syndrome:  the North Carolina protocol’. Olafur S. Palsson.  The International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis (January 2006), Vol.54 (1), p.p.51-64.

‘Hypnosis for Irritable Bowel Syndrome: the quest for the mechanism of action’. Magnus Simrén.  The International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis (January 2006), Vol.54(1), p.p.65-84.

‘Hypnosis home treatment for Irritable Bowel Syndrome: a pilot study’. Olafur S. Palsson, Marsha J. Turner, and William E. Whitehead.  The International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis (January 2006), Vol.54(1), p.p.85-99.

‘Effects of tailored and manualized hypnotic inductions for Complicated Irritable Bowel Syndrome’. Arreed […]

Irritable bowel syndrome and diet

Irritable bowel syndrome and diet – NHS – NICE

What is irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)?

IBS is a very common condition. It describes a wide range of symptoms that vary from one person to another and can be worse for some people than others.

The most common symptoms are:
wind and/or bloating
• diarrhoea or constipation, or both
• low abdominal pain, which may ease after opening the bowels or be accompanied by a change in bowel habit or stool appearance
• passing mucus
• feeling the need to open the bowels even after having just been to the toilet
• a feeling of urgency
• feeling that your symptoms are worse after eating.

Warning!
If you have any of the following symptoms consult your doctor immediately:
unintentional and unexplained weight loss; rectal bleeding; a family history of bowel or ovarian cancer; if you are over 60 years old, a change in bowel habit to looser and/or more frequent stools for more than 6 weeks. Before attempting to manage symptoms via your diet, it is important to rule our other medical conditions, and to have a diagnosis established by your doctor or healthcare professional.

Ensure that you:
• eat regular meals
• do not skip meals or eat late at night
• take your time when eating meals
• sit down to eat and chew your food well
• take regular exercise – for example, walking, cycling or swimming
• make time to relax.

Helpful hints:
• keep a food and symptom diary to see if diet affects your symptoms. Remember symptoms may not be caused by the food you have just eaten, but what you ate earlier that day or the day before.
• give your bowels time to adjust to any changes that you make.

Make changes […]

By |December 5th, 2011|Diet, IBS - Irritable bowel Syndrome, IBS A Alternating, IBS C Constipation, IBS D Diarrhoea, IBS W Wind / Gas, The Body|Comments Off on Irritable bowel syndrome and diet

What to do with suspected IBS in Under 2 Minutes

What to do with suspected IBS in Under 2 Minutes

Why:
Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) affects 20% of the population. The diagnosis should be considered in patients with at least a six month history of:

  •  Abdominal pain or discomfort
  •  Bloating
  •  Change in bowel habit

How:

  • Consider diagnosing IBS if abdominal pain or discomfort is:
  •  Relieved by defaecation or
  •  Associated with altered bowel frequency or stool form

and at least two of the following:

  • Altered stool passage (straining, urgency, incomplete evacuation)
  •  Abdominal bloating, distension, tension or hardness
  •  Symptoms made worse by eating
  •  Passage mucous
  • Lethargy, nausea, backache and bladder symptoms may be used to support diagnosis.

“Red Flag” indicators (refer to secondary care (Specialist GI Unit ) if present):

  • Unintentional and unexplained weight loss
  • Rectal bleeding
  •  Any family history of bowel or ovarian cancer
  • In people aged over 60, a change in bowel habit lasting more than 6-weeks with looser and/or more frequent stools.
  •  Anaemia
  • Abdominal masses
  •  Rectal masses
  •  Inflammatory markers for inflammatory bowel disease

If symptoms suggest ovarian cancer, undertake appropriate examination and referral Investigations to exclude other diagnoses. Investigate/refer as appropriate if abnormal:

  • Full blood count (FBC)
  • Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR)
  • C-reactive protein (CRP)
  • Anti-body testing for Coeliac Disease (Tissue Transglutaminase – TTG)

What next and when:
Provide information about self-help covering lifestyle, physical activity, diet and symptom targeted medication. Arrange follow up to assess response and re-assess “red flags”.
First line pharmacological treatment

  • Choose single or combination medication based on predominant symptom(s).
  •  antispasmodic agents
  •  laxatives for constipation (not lactulose)
  • loperamide for diarrhoea
  • Advise people to adjust doses according to response, shown by stool consistency.
  • Aim for soft well formed stool (Bristol Stool Form Type 4 )bristol stool type,faeces chart,bristol stool chart type,meyers scale,bristol stool scale ibs

Second line pharmacological treatment
Consider tricyclic antidepressants(TCAs)

Start at a low dose (5-10 mgs equivalent of amitriptyline) taken at night and review regularly. […]

Psychological factors affect IBS patients

Psychological factors affect IBS patients

Psychological factors affect IBS patients interpretation of symptom severity

A patient’s viewpoint of the severity of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms can be influenced not only by physical symptoms of IBS but broader psychological problems, according to a new study in http://medicalxpress.com/news/2011-11-psychological-factors-affect-ibs-patients.html, the official journal of the American Gastroenterological Association.

“Clinicians who face pressure to treat patients in a cost-effective manner within tight time constraints and at a satisfactory level are likely to find that patient-reported outcome data can increase their understanding of what patients mean when they describe how they function or feel,” said Jeffrey Lackner, PsyD, of the University at Buffalo School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, and lead author of this study. “To maximize the utility of patient-reported outcomes, it is important to know what they measure and what influences patients’ perceptions of their symptoms when gastroenterologists ask them about their symptoms. Our study suggests that irritable bowel syndrome patient-reported outcomes are not simply about gastrointestinal symptoms.”

Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are used to describe symptoms, inform treatment planning and gauge the benefit of treatments for gastrointestinal disorders, including IBS. In this study, funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, researchers explored two different PRO rating scales that measure IBS severity, and identified psychological factors that might bias PRO ratings by affecting how patients interpret symptom severity. They found that a substantial proportion of the variation in the PROs (50 to 55 percent) could be explained by three distinct gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms: pain, bloating and defecation.

While the study showed that GI symptoms explain some of the variance in overall IBS severity scores, there was a large […]

IBS course for the UK

IBS course for the UK

Today reading many of the Facebook comments and posts I posted the following in response to the suffering.

Hi can’t help feel for you guys. I had 20 years of ibs D. You have motivated
me over a few weeks to put together all the studying of IBS and my skills as a practitioner( not GP) to try and spread my message of how I conquered IBS now clear since 2006

I have a no nonsense site info only on useful tips and some of my relevant products www.irritable-bowel-syndrome-and-symptoms.com

Getting back to my project I intend and have prepared an IBS course for the uk it will be given based upon the geographical area of respondents.

Please email via contact page on site giving your email ( so I can contact you with dates times etc) and your name and location in the uk post code too would help. Subject : IBS course

I intend to show the mind body connection and diets and foods and much more including free cd for the attendees. This is the first I’ve mentioned this so watch the site for details.

Your comments triggered this keep as well as you can an IBS survivor!

Look forward to hearing from you.

Feel bloated Cramps

Feel bloated Cramps

The problem may be in your BRAIN

Angela Harewood still cringes at the memory of the comments she used to get from strangers about her advanced pregnancy.‘People would say things like “not long to go now” pointing to my swollen tummy,’ recalls Angela, 48, a company director from Abbots Langley, Hertfordshire. ‘It didn’t happen just once, but over and over again. The only trouble was, I wasn’t pregnant — just very badly constipated.’

All in the head? One way of treating IBS is ­hypnotising patients into a deeply relaxed state and asking them to place their hand on their ­stomach and ­generate feelings of warmth and comfort
All in the head? One way of treating IBS is ­hypnotising patients into a deeply relaxed state and asking them to place their hand on their ­stomach and ­generate feelings of warmth and comfort

Angela is one of the millions of Britons thought to suffer from Irritable Bowel ­Syndrome (IBS) — a problem with gut function which can cause symptoms such as constipation, diarrhoea, painful ­cramping, bloating and flatulence. The symptoms can be so severe in some cases that sufferers have to give up work. It is notoriously difficult to treat and, while the symptoms are undeniably real, tests often reveal no obvious physical cause, explains Dr Julian Stern, who treated Angela at the specialist bowel ­centre at St Mark’s ­Hospital, London.

For Angela, treatment at St Mark’s proved to be the turning point, thanks to a new approach that focuses on the link between the mind and bowel health. Angela’s symptoms started after the birth of her son, Ashley, when she was 30.
‘My constipation was awful: ­sometimes I couldn’t go to the loo for up to ten […]