Don’t worry, be happy

Don’t worry, be happy: Stress, anxiety could lead to dementia

Don’t worry – Experts say that chronic stress can wreak havoc on immune, metabolic and cardiovascular systems, and lead to atrophy of the brain’s hippocampus–crucial for long-term memory and spatial navigation. Here’s something so that you start taking stress more seriously. People who suffer from chronic stress and anxiety may be at an increased risk for developing depression and even dementia, says a new study suggests. Experiencing anxiety, fear and stress is considered a normal part of life when it is occasional and temporary, such as feeling anxious and stressed before an exam or a job interview.

However, when those acute emotional reactions become more frequent or chronic, they can significantly interfere with daily living activities such as work, school and relationships, according to researchers at Rotman Research Institute at Baycrest Health Sciences in Canada. Chronic stress is a pathological state that is caused by prolonged activation of the normal acute physiological stress response, which can wreak havoc on immune, metabolic and cardiovascular systems, and lead to atrophy of the brain’s hippocampus –crucial for long-term memory and spatial navigation. Researchers examined recent evidence from studies of stress and fear conditioning in animal models, and neuroimaging studies of stress and anxiety in healthy individuals and in clinical populations. They looked specifically at key structures in the neurocircuitry of fear and anxiety (amygdala, medial prefrontal cortex, hippocampus) which are impacted during exposure to chronic stress.

The researchers noted similar patterns of abnormal brain activity with fear/anxiety and chronic stress — specifically an overactive amygdala (associated with emotional responses) and an under-active PFC (thinking areas of the brain […]

By |February 23rd, 2016|Anxiety, Depression, Disease, Exam stress, Job Interview, Latest News, Lifestyle, Stress, Talking Therapy, The Body, The Mind|Comments Off on Don’t worry, be happy

Quick and Easy Stress Management

Living in modern life means that we all have to deal with stress. Sometimes this can be a positive force in our lives. It can motivate and get us going. However, sometimes stress can really get us down. Fortunately, there are plenty of tools out there to help us cope and deal with life’s pressures.

Here are a few tips to help you get through life’s stresses.

Stressed people naturally touch their forehead. This is because touching the forehead does actually relieve stress. Put two fingers on the boniest part above the eyebrows and think about whatever is causing you tension. You will be able to feel a pulsating underneath your fingers. When the pulsating has eased and you feel that it is difficult to think about the stress. Then you are finished.

Regard your emotional ups and downs as an avenue to learn and grow rather than as an enemy that must be combated. Getting angry at the stress only creates more dis-stress and makes you feel worse. Thanking it, even if you have no idea how it is going to help you to learn in the future is empowering. It gives you hope, which puts positive energy into the situation.

Vitamins C and B complex are the stress vitamins. When under pressure or emotional strain, take a higher dose of both than normal. They are both good for your adrenal glands, which produce your ‘fight, freeze or flight’ hormones. The glands can become exhausted under stress, and make you feel tired and even more stressed, an ever increasing circle of despare. These vitamins balance and calm the adrenal glands, allowing you to get back to your normal […]

By |April 8th, 2014|Free Meditation Download, Hypnotherapy, Stress, Support Organisations, Talking Therapy, The Mind|Comments Off on Quick and Easy Stress Management

Mild Mental Illness Hypnotherapy can Help

Mild Mental Illness Hypnotherapy can Help

According to The Guardian in an article published on the 19th June 2013, official figures from the Office of National Statistics have shown that mild mental illness such as anxiety and depression affects nearly one in five UK adults. An in-depth look at the findings showed that the highest level of mild mental health illness is in the 50-54 year old age group and among women. Additionally high levels of anxiety or depression was seen in those who were relatively unhappy with their health compared to just 11 percent who were happy with their health.

Hypnotherapy can work towards establishing the root of the problem and teach the client techniques to control symptoms such as anxiety.”

This year’s figures are of great interest to those in the health and well-being sector as The National Council for Hypnotherapy spokesperson explained:

“It is always great to raise awareness of mental health by gathering statistics and investigating any problem areas that may be occurring in the UK. Whilst it is recommended to visit a GP if you feel you are affected by any of the mentioned mild mental health issues, it is also worth noting that complementary therapies can also help relieve symptoms. Hypnotherapy can work towards establishing the root of the problem and teach the client techniques to control symptoms such as anxiety.”

source: http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2013/jun/19/anxiety-depression-office-national-statistics

By |July 9th, 2013|Anxiety, Depression|Comments Off on Mild Mental Illness Hypnotherapy can Help

Hypnotherapy Responds to Figures Revealing Absences in the Workplace

Hypnotherapy Responds to Figures Revealing Absences in the Workplace

According to The Telegraph in an article published on the 26 June 2013, anxiety and stress are the most popular reasons for missing time off work. An official major nationwide study looked at tens of thousands of sick notes issued by GP’s and found that 35 per cent were for reasons associated with mild to moderate mental health disorders. A spokesperson from the Department for Work and Pensions said:

“Sickness absence is a burden to business, to the taxpayer and to the thousands of people who end up trapped on benefits when they could actually work. Supporting people with mental health problems to return to work more quickly will be an important part of the new independent health and work advisory service.”

One way to help people deal with mild mental health disorders is by using complementary therapies such as hypnotherapy. The National Council for Hypnotherapy (NCH) gives members of the general public access to local hypnotherapist’s details from all over the UK which can be used to arrange hypnotism sessions. This can help a variety of issues including weight loss, phobias, habits like smoking and anxiety or stress. In this case, hypnotherapy could help the client reduce levels of anxiety and stress through discussing the issue and using hypnotic techniques to control and alleviate symptoms.

“This could help those who are absent from work due to anxiety and stress and reduce symptoms with the goal of returning the client back to the workplace ASAP,” added a spokesperson from the NCH.

The National Council for Hypnotherapy aims to highlight the variety of uses for hypnotherapy.

NCH represents over 1800 hypnotherapy professionals within the UK and is committed to […]

By |July 9th, 2013|Anxiety, Hypnotherapy, Stress|Comments Off on Hypnotherapy Responds to Figures Revealing Absences in the Workplace

Does hypnotherapy work Science says YES!

Does hypnotherapy work Science says YES!

Hypnosis and hypnotherapy is quickly gaining ground as a recognized therapy.
Photo: Hypnotherapy
Thursday, May 2, 2013 – Steps to Authentic Happiness via Positive Psychology by Paul Mountjoy

Hypnosis seems helpful in treating addictions and the depression and anxiety associated with them”- Psychology Today

Hypnosis and hypnotherapy has been rooted in science with evidence based results reported for many years. Although the American Medical Association (AMA) currently has no clear position on the effectiveness of hypnosis and hypnotherapy, in 1958, the AMA reported hypnotherapy has a recognized place in the medical armamentarium and is a useful technique in the treatment of certain illnesses.

Hypnotherapy is considered an effective adjunct in psychotherapy for many issues, and more are being studied. On its own, hypnotherapy is reported to be beneficial: In 2001, the British Psychological Society commissioned a group of expert psychologists and published a report that declared hypnosis a proven therapeutic medium and valid for study.

The report went on to say hypnotherapy is beneficial for a wide range of issues encountered in medicine, psychology and psychiatry with regard to stress, anxiety, pain, and psychosomatic illnesses. Some illnesses described are insomnia, irritable bowel syndrome, headaches and migraines, asthma and a variety of skin maladies. Weight reduction was also cited as benefiting from hypnotherapy.

A comparison study reported in 2007 by American Health Magazine indicates some psychological issues benefit more from hypnotherapy than psychoanalysis and behavior therapy.  A German university meta-analysis of 444 studies supported this claim, concluding a 64 percent success rate with hypnotherapy for stress, anxiety and chronic pain.

According to Sanjay Paul, A psychology instructor at several universities, hypnosis is a heightened sense of suggestibility for accessing the […]

By |May 23rd, 2013|Hypnotherapy|Comments Off on Does hypnotherapy work Science says YES!

New Figures about British Phobias

Figures about British Phobias

The National Council for Hypnotherapy Responds to New Figures about British Phobias

According to the International Business Times, half of adults living in the UK suffer phobias with most popular topics being listed by one third of participants as heights, one in seven stated they were afraid of flying and one in ten of spiders. The study measured how affected sufferers were by their phobias and one in ten said it had affected relationships and a further more worrying 7 percent said that it had cost them their job.

The study looked at over 2,000 people and aimed to highlight the importance of tackling phobias head on before they truly affect a lifestyle.

An effective way to solve phobias is to use hypnotherapy. The National Council for Hypnotherapy members have helped hundreds of thousands of clients conquer their fears and phobias through establishing the root of the phobia and working to help the mind re-think the way such topics are approached. As one of the UK’s most established hypnotherapy directories, the NCH gives clients the chance to find local hypnotherapists in their area throughout the British Isles.

A spokesperson from the Council added, ‘As this study highlights phobias are extremely common in the UK – from small fears of spiders to more extreme phobias such as fear of large crowds, the figures suggest that half of adults experience some sort of phobia in their adult life. Hypnotherapy can work towards eliminating these fears by changing the way the mind thinks about the trigger for the phobia.’

The National Council for Hypnotherapy continues to follow health related […]

By |May 23rd, 2013|About Me|Comments Off on New Figures about British Phobias

Proposed structure of local health delivery in Dudley and beyond

Proposed structure of local health delivery in Dudley and beyond

Healthwatch Dudley & Dudley CCG  – Ideas for future structure of local health delivery

Proposed structure of local health delivery in Dudley and beyond – Why? The structure of healthcare in the community should in my opinion should be reviewed. I have had conversations with The King’s Fund regarding health care provision for the future in the UK. I have voiced these ideas to try to stimulate dialogue, but getting to the decision makers in very near impossible. Making me believe the top down approach to decision making despite the portrayal of a bottom up approach to changes in local and national NHS Service. The proposed ‘Phoenix structure” is to utilise local schools and redundant buildings that have for whatever reason become redundant.

Why a rethink?

The current community health centre is just that, a health centre. what I propose is a centre with a health section but encompassing all the disciplines listed below. Stress is the foundation for many illnesses and if eliminated or substantially reduced, could bring about fundamental change to the local communities, their Health and wellbeing and wealth to the country ultimately. GDP suffers due to the amount of hours lost to stress alone, let alone the additional burden of all the more serious implicated illnesses caused by stress. These in my opinion could be alleviated if not eliminated for the majority by introducing a centre that was multi faceted.

These would have a primary wellness role. The incorporation of suitably qualified ‘Complementary’ therapies along with the utilisation of of the premises by multi charitable organisations after normal business hours, after all […]

By |May 22nd, 2013|About Me, Education, Latest News, Lifestyle, Support Organisations|Comments Off on Proposed structure of local health delivery in Dudley and beyond

Stress drives teachers out of schools

Stress drives teachers out of schools

Targets, bureaucracy and ballooning workloads make teachers increasingly anxious, delegates at NUT conference are told

Science teacher

Is teaching the most stressful profession? Photograph: David Levene/Guardian

Stress is driving increasing numbers of teachers out of the profession, with some even considering suicide, a teaching union conference heard on Monday.

Delegates at the National Union of Teachers conference in Harrogate heard there had been a “meteoric” rise in work-related stress due to demands to meet government targets.

Research by the Health and Safety Executive in 2000 found teaching to be the most stressful profession, with 41.5% of teachers reporting themselves as “highly stressed”.

Sue McMahon, a delegate from Calderdale, West Yorkshire, said: “As a divisional secretary, I have seen a meteoric rise in work-related stress and on more than one occasion have had to support a member who has attempted suicide.

“This … is due to the demands being placed on our members to hit government targets.”

She said a “target tsunami” from government is “sweeping away those that you are struggling to support”.

Laura Fisher from Wakefield told delegates how two weeks into her first job as a teacher, a colleague looked at her and said: “‘Go home and drink a bottle of wine and you’ll be fine.’ I said ‘I don’t drink’, and he said, ‘give it six months’.

“That was six years ago. I still don’t drink, but I do like chocolate.”

The NUT is concerned that an increase in form-filling has driven up teachers’ workloads.

The union passed two resolutions, calling for the union to support victims of work stress and for the Health and Safety Executive to intervene in schools where employers do not […]

By |April 10th, 2012|Anxiety, Sleep, Stress, The Body, The Mind, What Conditions Can Hypnosis Help|Comments Off on Stress drives teachers out of schools

Panic Attacks and Anxiety

Panic Attacks and Anxiety

Panic Attacks and Anxiety and hypnosis papers

Hypnosis and CBT with depression and anxiety’. Ester German.  Australian Journal of Clinical & Experimental Hypnosis (May 2004) Vol. 32(1), p.p. 71-85. ‘Cognitive-behavioural hypnotic treatment for managing examination anxiety and facilitating performance’. Calvin Kai-Ching Yu.  Contemporary Hypnosis (2006), Vol. 2(23), p.p. 72-82.  www.interscience.wiley.com/journal/ch‘The casual role of negative imagery in social anxiety: a test in confident public speaking’. Hirsch C. et al.  Journal of Behaviour Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry (2006), Vol.37(2). ‘The role of imagery in the maintenance and treatment of snake fear’. Hunt M. et al.  Journal of Behaviour Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry (2006), Vol. 37(4).

By |December 16th, 2011|Anxiety, CBT - Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, Depression, Fears, Panic Attacks, Stress|Comments Off on Panic Attacks and Anxiety

Psychological factors affect IBS patients

Psychological factors affect IBS patients

Psychological factors affect IBS patients interpretation of symptom severity

A patient’s viewpoint of the severity of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms can be influenced not only by physical symptoms of IBS but broader psychological problems, according to a new study in http://medicalxpress.com/news/2011-11-psychological-factors-affect-ibs-patients.html, the official journal of the American Gastroenterological Association.

“Clinicians who face pressure to treat patients in a cost-effective manner within tight time constraints and at a satisfactory level are likely to find that patient-reported outcome data can increase their understanding of what patients mean when they describe how they function or feel,” said Jeffrey Lackner, PsyD, of the University at Buffalo School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, and lead author of this study. “To maximize the utility of patient-reported outcomes, it is important to know what they measure and what influences patients’ perceptions of their symptoms when gastroenterologists ask them about their symptoms. Our study suggests that irritable bowel syndrome patient-reported outcomes are not simply about gastrointestinal symptoms.”

Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are used to describe symptoms, inform treatment planning and gauge the benefit of treatments for gastrointestinal disorders, including IBS. In this study, funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, researchers explored two different PRO rating scales that measure IBS severity, and identified psychological factors that might bias PRO ratings by affecting how patients interpret symptom severity. They found that a substantial proportion of the variation in the PROs (50 to 55 percent) could be explained by three distinct gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms: pain, bloating and defecation.

While the study showed that GI symptoms explain some of the variance in overall IBS severity scores, there was a large […]