Man hypnotises himself before operation

Man hypnotises himself before operation

A hypnotist from West Sussex has undergone surgery on his right hand without a general anaesthetic. Alex Lenkei, 61, from Worthing, chose to sedate himself by hypnosis before undergoing the 83-minute operation. He said he was fully aware of everything going on around him during the procedure but was free from pain. The operation at Worthing Hospital involved removing some bone in the base of the thumb and fusing some joints in an attempt to improve his arthritis. Consultant orthopaedic surgeon David Llewellyn-Clark said he was happy in agreeing to the unusual sedation on Mr Lenkei, a registered hypnotist who has been practising since the age of 16.

At one stage a hammer and chisel was used as well as a surgical saw, but I felt no pain Mr Lenkei said Wednesday’s surgery “went amazingly well”. “It took between 30 seconds to a minute for me to place myself under hypnosis, and from that point I felt a very deep relaxation. “I was aware of everything around me, from people talking and at one stage a hammer and chisel was used as well as a surgical saw, but I felt no pain.” Throughout the operation, an anaesthetist was on standby to administer an anaesthetic if necessary. Mr Llewellyn-Clark said he had been confident that Mr Lenkei was a skilled hypnotist and was “delighted all went well”.

By |June 20th, 2009|Hypnotherapy, Latest News|Comments Off on Man hypnotises himself before operation

A tot of hypnosis stopped me drinking

Hypnosis stopped me drinking

A tot of hypnosis stopped me drinking

Over the Christmas period I was suddenly surprised by faith. I don’t mean that I found God; I mean that over a few days, against my preconceptions, I become a true believer in hypnosis. On December 5 I went to a hypnotherapist to be hypnotised into stopping drinking, and it worked.

ProseccoAs a scientific materialist, I have always been sceptical about alternative therapies. There may just be something in black boxes or Rolfing or homeopathy, but there just isn’t enough evidence – or in some cases any evidence – that they work. There certainly isn’t enough scientific evidence about any of them to justify chancing National Health Service money on them. All the same, hypnotism seems to have done something remarkable for me.

It began when my GP, who is a friend and knows I love medical talk, was discussing treatments of fashionable obsessive compulsive and eating disorders: he remarked that hypnotherapy seemed to work surprisingly well for some people. “Does it work for drinking?” I found myself asking. He replied that it was worth trying and recommended someone nearby.

This is not a confessional column. I am not proposing to use the word alcoholic. I reject the notion of middle-aged, middle-class binge drinkers. All I am saying is that I recognised late last year that the time had come for me to take control of alcohol before it took control of me; there are alcoholics in my family, and my husband’s parents conducted life afloat on a choppy sea of dry martinis, carefully chosen wine and digestifs. Hypnosis sounded quick, and if it worked, easy. So off I […]

By |February 18th, 2008|Addiction, Hypnotherapy, Latest News, Men's Issues, The Mind, Weight Management, What Conditions Can Hypnosis Help, Womens Issues|Comments Off on A tot of hypnosis stopped me drinking

Therapy maze

Therapy maze

A guide to the therapy maze

How can you recognise which therapies are safe and who are the reputable practitioners? Here we guide you through the therapy maze.

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy

What is it?

Practical techniques are used to turn negative thoughts and actions into more positive ones.

How does it work?

The CBT therapist is a bit like a personal mental trainer – they set goals and give the client clear guidelines about how to achieve the changes they want.

The Claims

Clinical trials have shown it is very effective in treating phobias, anxiety, depression and compulsive disorders such as severe over-eating or obsessive cleanliness. Businesses swear by it for stress management. The Department of Health gives it their seal of approval.

The Pain

All therapy can bring unpleasant buried emotions to the surface and CBT is no exception. It is also very goal-oriented and some people may feel that it puts too much pressure on them to achieve results.

Who should do it

Particularly suitable for people with anxiety, phobias and depression. But if you are looking for an in-depth understanding of your relationships, this may not be the therapy for you.

Our expert says:

‘Research has shown that this therapy is very effective in helping people tackle their problems, be they phobias, stress, depression or compulsive behaviour. It is very problem-solving and can produce remarkable results.

‘The downside is that if you really don’t want to face your fears, the therapy itself might increase your anxieties.’ SP

Hypnotherapy

What is it?

Hypnosis is a state of deep relaxation. Contrary to popular belief, you are not unconscious during hypnosis – but your conscious awareness operates at a different, deeper level.

How does it work?

Before clients enter the hypnotic state, they […]

By |February 18th, 2008|CBT - Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, Resources, Reviews|Comments Off on Therapy maze

Therapy Benefits IBS

Therapy Benefits IBS

Cognitive Therapy Benefits IBS

Cognitive behavioral therapy and hypnotherapy have been successfully used in the treatment of a variety of chronic syndromes, including common functional disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, such as irritable bowel syndrome. New research presented today at Digestive Disease Week® 2006 (DDW) again asserts that these therapies may have a powerful impact on the digestive system including improving symptoms of lower GI tract disorders. DDW is the largest international gathering of physicians and researchers in the fields of gastroenterology, hepatology, endoscopy and gastrointestinal surgery.

“These studies illustrate the intricate ties between the digestive tract and other major body systems,” said Emeran Mayer, M.D., professor of medicine, physiology and psychiatry, University of California, Los Angeles. “Physicians must recognize these connections to help treat patients more effectively.”

A Randomized Controlled Trial of Therapist-Administered vs Minimal-Therapist-Contact Cognitive Behavioral Treatment for Moderate to Severe IBS

Preliminary research funded by the National Institutes of Health shows that behavioral therapy may be quite effective in treating symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) unresponsive to standard medications and dietary agents. However, it can be an expensive and time-consuming option. Study authors from the University at Buffalo, State University of New York condensed a behavioral treatment program into a four session patient-administered format with minimal therapist contact in an attempt to reduce the costs and time-commitment for patients. Researchers found that even though the four-session program required less therapist time, it was as effective as the 10-week, clinic-based program in relieving the range of GI symptoms of IBS.

Researchers randomly assigned 59 patients to receive a 10-week; clinic-based behavioral treatment (CBT); a four-session behavioral program (MC-CBT); […]

What techniques are utilised

What techniques are utilised

What techniques are utilised, and what’s the background on them

Definition

“Hypnotherapist” — Induces an hypnotic state in the client . Prepares client to enter hypnotic states by explaining how hypnosis works and what client will experience. Tests subject to determine degrees of physical and emotional suggestibility. Induces hypnotic state in client using individualized methods and techniques of hypnosis. He/she may train client in self-hypnosis.

“Clinical Hypnotherapist” – Clinical hypnosis is a procedure during which a qualified professional or therapist (the “hypnotist”) gives a patient carefully worded instructions to follow with the goal of helping the patient enter a state of deep relaxation. In this hypnotic state, the “hypnotized” client is aware of everything that is going on, but at the same time, becomes increasingly absorbed in using his or her imagination as directed by the hypnotist.

The hypnosis practitioner uses carefully worded language to help the patient enter into a state of highly focused, suggestible attentiveness in which the patient is able to clear away mental “clutter” and focus on his or her problem and solutions to the problem. Hypnosis practitioners employ a body of techniques to help their patients acquire the self-control, self-mastery, willpower and confidence to visualize, realize and achieve their goals. Frequently, hypnosis practitioners teach their patients self-hypnosis methods that they can employ on their own to reinforce and continue the process of positive change.

The hypnotist gives the patient suggestions to experience changes in behaviours, feelings, sensations, images, perceptions, thoughts, beliefs, and/or physical functions or symptoms. Suggestions are typically included for relaxation, calmness, confidence, increased self-control and well-being. Instructions typically include imagining or thinking about pleasant experiences.

Hypnosis is a relationship-based process of communication […]

By |November 27th, 2007|About Me, Anxiety, Digestive Disorders, Fears, Hypnotherapy, Stress|Comments Off on What techniques are utilised
%d bloggers like this: