Does hypnotherapy work Science says YES!

Does hypnotherapy work Science says YES!

Hypnosis and hypnotherapy is quickly gaining ground as a recognized therapy.
Photo: Hypnotherapy
Thursday, May 2, 2013 – Steps to Authentic Happiness via Positive Psychology by Paul Mountjoy

Hypnosis seems helpful in treating addictions and the depression and anxiety associated with them”- Psychology Today

Hypnosis and hypnotherapy has been rooted in science with evidence based results reported for many years. Although the American Medical Association (AMA) currently has no clear position on the effectiveness of hypnosis and hypnotherapy, in 1958, the AMA reported hypnotherapy has a recognized place in the medical armamentarium and is a useful technique in the treatment of certain illnesses.

Hypnotherapy is considered an effective adjunct in psychotherapy for many issues, and more are being studied. On its own, hypnotherapy is reported to be beneficial: In 2001, the British Psychological Society commissioned a group of expert psychologists and published a report that declared hypnosis a proven therapeutic medium and valid for study.

The report went on to say hypnotherapy is beneficial for a wide range of issues encountered in medicine, psychology and psychiatry with regard to stress, anxiety, pain, and psychosomatic illnesses. Some illnesses described are insomnia, irritable bowel syndrome, headaches and migraines, asthma and a variety of skin maladies. Weight reduction was also cited as benefiting from hypnotherapy.

A comparison study reported in 2007 by American Health Magazine indicates some psychological issues benefit more from hypnotherapy than psychoanalysis and behavior therapy.  A German university meta-analysis of 444 studies supported this claim, concluding a 64 percent success rate with hypnotherapy for stress, anxiety and chronic pain.

According to Sanjay Paul, A psychology instructor at several universities, hypnosis is a heightened sense of suggestibility for accessing the […]

By |May 23rd, 2013|Hypnotherapy|Comments Off on Does hypnotherapy work Science says YES!

Psychological factors affect IBS patients

Psychological factors affect IBS patients

Psychological factors affect IBS patients interpretation of symptom severity

A patient’s viewpoint of the severity of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms can be influenced not only by physical symptoms of IBS but broader psychological problems, according to a new study in http://medicalxpress.com/news/2011-11-psychological-factors-affect-ibs-patients.html, the official journal of the American Gastroenterological Association.

“Clinicians who face pressure to treat patients in a cost-effective manner within tight time constraints and at a satisfactory level are likely to find that patient-reported outcome data can increase their understanding of what patients mean when they describe how they function or feel,” said Jeffrey Lackner, PsyD, of the University at Buffalo School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, and lead author of this study. “To maximize the utility of patient-reported outcomes, it is important to know what they measure and what influences patients’ perceptions of their symptoms when gastroenterologists ask them about their symptoms. Our study suggests that irritable bowel syndrome patient-reported outcomes are not simply about gastrointestinal symptoms.”

Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are used to describe symptoms, inform treatment planning and gauge the benefit of treatments for gastrointestinal disorders, including IBS. In this study, funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, researchers explored two different PRO rating scales that measure IBS severity, and identified psychological factors that might bias PRO ratings by affecting how patients interpret symptom severity. They found that a substantial proportion of the variation in the PROs (50 to 55 percent) could be explained by three distinct gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms: pain, bloating and defecation.

While the study showed that GI symptoms explain some of the variance in overall IBS severity scores, there was a large […]

Irritable Bowel Syndrome eased

Irritable Bowel Syndrome eased

Irritable Bowel Syndrome eased by hypnotherapy – Thousands of people with irritable bowel syndrome will be offered hope by new research showing that hypnotherapy eases the conditions in sufferers. Professor Roland Valori, a gastroenterologist at Gloucestershire Royal Hospital, in Gloucester, said heRoland Valorihas used hypnotherapy with success on his patients. In a podcast to launch Frontline Gastroenterology, a new medical journal, he said experience of the first 100 patients treated with hypnotherapy, nine out of ten showed significant improvement in their symptoms. In four out of ten the condition cleared up completely while the remainder said they felt more in control. Irritable bowel syndrome is a long term disorder of the digestive system causing pain, bloating, diarrhoea and constipation. Prof Valori said: “To be frank, I have never looked back.”

By |September 9th, 2011|Hypnotherapy, IBS - Irritable bowel Syndrome|Comments Off on Irritable Bowel Syndrome eased

Hypnotherapy ‘can help’ irritable bowel syndrome

Hypnotherapy ‘can help’ irritable bowel syndrome

Greater use of hypnotherapy to ease the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome would help sufferers and might save money, says a gastroenterologist.Dr Roland Valori, editor of Frontline Gastroenterology, said of the first 100 of his patients treated, symptoms improved significantly for nine in 10.

He said that although previous research has shown hypnotherapy is effective for IBS sufferers, it is not widely used.

This may be because doctors simply do not believe it works.

Widely ignored

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common gut problem which can cause abdominal pain, bloating, and sometimes diarrhoea or constipation.

Dr Valori, of Gloucestershire Royal Hospital, said the research evidence which shows that hypnotherapy could help sufferers of IBS was first published in the 1980s.

He thinks it has been widely ignored because many doctors find it hard to believe that it does work, or to comprehend how it could work.

It is pretty clear to me that it has an amazing effect
Dr Roland Valori, editor of Frontline Gastroenterology

He began referring IBS patients for hypnotherapy in the early 1990s and has found it to be highly effective.

“To be frank, I have never looked back,” he said.

He audited the first 100 cases he referred for hypnotherapy and found that the symptoms stopped completely in four in ten cases with typical IBS.

He says in a further five in 10 cases patients reported feeling more […]

By |June 10th, 2011|Hypnotherapy, IBS - Irritable bowel Syndrome, IBS A Alternating, IBS C Constipation, IBS D Diarrhoea, IBS W Wind / Gas, Womens Issues|Comments Off on Hypnotherapy ‘can help’ irritable bowel syndrome

Depression and Anxiety

Depression and Anxiety

Therapy decreases patients depression and anxiety

Research suggests that therapy effectively decreases patients’ depression and anxiety and related symptoms – such as pain, fatigue and nausea. Psychotherapy, particularly anxiety therapy, has been found to increase survival time for heart surgery and cancer patients, and it can have a positive effect on the body’s immune system. Research increasingly supports the idea that emotional and physical health are very closely linked and that psychotherapy can improve a person’s overall health. There is convincing evidence that most people who have at least several sessions of psychotherapy are far better off than untreated individuals with emotional difficulties. One major study showed that 50 percent of patients noticeably improved after eight sessions while 75 percent of individuals in counseling psychotherapy improved by the end of six months. Psychotherapy with children is similar in effectiveness to psychotherapy with adults.

If you or your child are facing challenges in life, or just need a little extra support in managing your work, family or relationship stresses, counseling psychotherapy can help you learn techniques to manage stress efficiently.

There are several different therapeutic methods a therapist may employ—cognitive behavioral (CBT), art therapy, play therapy, anxiety therapy, hypnotherapy, family system therapy—and many counseling psychotherapy approaches draw upon various methods to create a custom-made therapy program. Therapists often work with their clients to create a treatment plan that encompasses different techniques to best address their client’s particular problems. Whether your prefer play therapy, anxiety therapy, or an eclectic approach – psychotherapy should be a partnership between you and a licensed professional. The appropriate counseling psychotherapy approach will depend on your personal therapy goals. Search TherapyTribe.com online directory to review […]

By |June 17th, 2010|Anxiety, Cancer, Depression|Comments Off on Depression and Anxiety

Gut Feelings: The Mind-Body Connection

Gut Feelings

Gut Feelings: The Mind-Body Connection

If you’ve ever felt your insides twist in knots before a big speech, you know the stomach listens carefully to the brain. In fact, the entire digestive system is closely tuned to a person’s emotions and state of mind, says William E. Whitehead, PhD, a professor of medicine and an adjunct professor of psychology at the University of North Carolina. People with irritable bowel syndrome often suffer flare-ups during times of stress and anxiety, and even perfectly healthy people can worry their way to stomach pain, nausea, diarrhea, constipation, or other problems. Even if a doctor can’t find anything physically wrong, the misery is real.

In the past
Back when scientists believed the mind and the body operated as separate entities — some physicians wrote off digestive distress with no sign of organic disease as being “all in the head.” But in recent years, that wall has crumbled. Doctors now see intricate links between the nervous system and the digestive system. The two realms constantly exchange streams of chemical and electrical messages, and anything that affects one is likely to affect the other. The connections between the two systems are so tight that scientists often refer to them as one entity: the brain-gut axis. (The brain-gut axis is a hot topic in medicine. In the summer of 2001, more than 100 researchers from around the world gathered in Los Angeles for a convention called “2001: A Brain-Gut Odyssey.”) For people suffering from persistent digestive troubles unconnected to disease, such research suggests that reducing stress, depression, and anxiety may go a long way toward calming the gut.

Listening to your gut
It may surprise many people to learn that the gut actually contains […]

Hypnosis for the people

Hypnosis for the people

All doctors should know how to perform hypnotherapy on their patients, according to a US expert. Professor David Spiegel, of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Sciences at Stanford University, said the therapy had been shown to help patients deal with pain, and could potentially be used in many other situations, such as helping people cope with long-term illnesses.

Professor Spiegel told BBC News Online: “We have more and more people living with these illnesses who need help coping with them, and hypnosis is a safe and effective way to teach people how to manage their own response, how to take the edge off their pain, how to think through their anxiety and not let it overwhelm them.”

The Stanford scientist made his comments at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Boston. He teaches self-hypnosis to help people manage their symptoms themselves.

Different colours

“If they have pain, I’ll have them imagine they’re doing to the part of their body that hurts what they actually do in the real world when it hurts, whether it’s using a bag of ice cubes or applying heat.”

Professor Spiegel said studies had shown hypnosis did help patients. In a study of women with breast cancer his team is due to publish later this year, those given support plus self-hypnosis had half the pain of those not given that combination.

His team has also found evidence that the brain’s reaction can be changed under hypnosis.

A study of people classed as highly receptive to hypnosis looked at how colour was processed in their brains.

Real view

They were shown patterns, either in colour, or in shades of grey. […]

By |February 18th, 2008|Hypnotherapy, Latest News, Resources, Reviews, Self Hypnosis, The Mind|Comments Off on Hypnosis for the people

Pain Reliever

Pain Reliever

Positive Thinking a Pain Reliever

US experts say they have strong scientific proof that mind over matter works for relieving pain.

Positive thinking was as powerful as a shot of morphine for relieving pain and reduced activity in parts of the brain that process pain information.

The Wake Forest University researchers say their findings show that by merely expecting pain to be less it will be less.

Their work is published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Positive thinking

Dr Robert Coghill and his team studied 10 normal, healthy volunteers who had a heat simulator applied to their legs while their brains were being scanned using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).

The heat simulator was used to produce pain and fMRI was used to map brain activity.

Before subjects underwent brain imaging, they learned to expect mild, moderate, or severe painful heat stimuli following different signals. None of the stimuli were hot enough to cause burns or damage the skin.

During brain imaging, a small percentage of the severe stimuli were incorrectly signalled as moderate stimuli to create expectations of decreased pain.

All 10 volunteers reported less pain when they expected lower levels of pain.

These expectations reduced reports of pain by more than 28% – similar to an analgesic dose of the potent painkiller morphine.

At the same time, activity in areas of the brain important to both sensory and emotional processing of pain decreased. These areas included the primary somatosensory cortex, the insular cortex and the anterior cingulate […]

By |February 18th, 2008|Hypnotherapy, Pain|Comments Off on Pain Reliever